"In the end, I’ve come to believe in something I call “The Physics of the Quest.” A force in nature governed by laws as real as the laws of gravity. The rule of Quest Physics goes something like this: If you’re brave enough to leave behind everything familiar and comforting, which can be anything from your house to bitter, old resentments, and set out on a truth-seeking journey, either externally or internally, and if you are truly willing to regard everything that happens to you on that journey as a clue and if you accept everyone you meet along the way as a teacher and if you are prepared, most of all, to face and forgive some very difficult realities about yourself, then the truth will not be withheld from you."

— Liz Gilbert - Eat, Pray, Love

"Kindness in words creates confidence. Kindness in thinking creates profoundness. Kindness in giving creates love."

— Lao Tzu

"Passion has little to do with euphoria and everything to do with patience. It is not about feeling good. It is about endurance. Like patience, passion comes from the same Latin root: pati. It does not mean to flow with exuberance. It means to suffer."

— Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves (via quoted-books)

jtotheizzoe:

More Than Just Black…
Adam Elsheimer’s The Flight Into Egypt is considered the first known painting to accurately depict the stars of the night sky and the Milky Way. Can you find Ursa Major?
Interestingly, this painting is said to date from around 1609, yet that means it predates Galileo’s first published telescope observations by a year (Galileo’s Sidereus Nuncius was published in 1610, although he made observations in 1609), and he likely couldn’t have seen all this with the naked eye. Any art or science historians know the full story? 
It’s a beautiful thing to see that science has been influencing art for so long.

jtotheizzoe:

More Than Just Black…

Adam Elsheimer’s The Flight Into Egypt is considered the first known painting to accurately depict the stars of the night sky and the Milky Way. Can you find Ursa Major?

Interestingly, this painting is said to date from around 1609, yet that means it predates Galileo’s first published telescope observations by a year (Galileo’s Sidereus Nuncius was published in 1610, although he made observations in 1609), and he likely couldn’t have seen all this with the naked eye. Any art or science historians know the full story? 

It’s a beautiful thing to see that science has been influencing art for so long.